Diamond Stingily

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CV

Education

2008 – 2012 BFA Creative Writing Non-fiction, Columbia College, Chicago, IL

Solo Exhibitions

upcoming spring 2018, ICA Miami, Miami, FL

upcoming fall 2017, Ramiken, New York, NY

2016, September 18 – October 16, “Elephant Memory”, Ramiken, New York, NY

2016, May 6 – June 19, “Kaas”, Queer Thoughts, New York, NY

Group Exhibitions

upcoming September 8, 2017 – January 7, 2018, “Sonic Rebellion: Music as Resistance”, curated by Jens Hoffmann, Suzanne Feld Hilberry, Carleton Gholz, and Robin K. Williams, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, Detroit, MI

upcoming fall 2017, “Trigger”, curated by Johanna Burton, New Museum, New York, NY

2016, July 29 – August 21, “Object Anthology”, Publishing House, Gstaad, Switzerland

2016, October 24, 2015 – February 28, 2016, “Round 43: Small Business/Big Change: Economic Perspectives from Artists and Artrepreneurs”, Martine Syms (in collaboration with Diamond Stingily), Project Row Houses, Houston, TX

2015, November 22 – December 20, “Denude”, Ramiken, New York, NY

2015, August 13 – September 18, “The End of Violent Crime”, Queer Thoughts, New York, NY

2015, April 9 – April 15, “Small Pillow”, Queer Thoughts at Arcadia Missa, London, UK

2015, January, “Rainbow”, Queer Thoughts, New York, NY

Online Exhibition

2017, May 5 – June 1, “Screen: Diamond Stingily: Sandra’s Walk”, Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, https://www.moca.org/screen

Readings

2017, May 14, Juliana Huxtable and Diamond Stingily, McNally Jackson Books, New York, NY

2017, February 21, “Readings”, Artist Space Books & Talks, New York, NY

2017, January 27, Justin Allen & Diamond Stingily, Poetry Project, New York, NY

2015, September 14, “A Reading By Diamond Antoinette Stingily”, Queer Thoughts, New York, NY

Publication

2015, “Love Diamond”, published by Dominica Publishing

Volunteering

since October 2016, volunteer at Wide Rainbow (a contemporary art after school educational program for girls), New York, NY

Artist Statement

I want to reconstruct the idea of art for people who grew up similar to my social and economic background. I don’t believe art should be intimidating or only for the privileged. As a writer and an artist I want to show how an object can tell a story and share an experience. It makes the experience universal and hopefully through this form of vulnerability creates necessary conversations. I want to explore racism, colorism, femininity, surveillance, paranoia and phobias within my community and question ideas of structure.

At the moment my subject matter is constant surveillance. In dominant Black neighborhoods in stores, restaurants and on the streets there are cameras. Black people are reminded with signs that read “Smile.You’re on camera” to smile. On streets in dominant Black neighborhoods, crime is migrated due to the surveillance cameras and bright lights used at night. The city doesn’t take into account the residents who live in the buildings on the block and how it takes a toll on the mental health of the people living in these high surveillance neighborhoods. Through technology these are practices of anti-blackness.

I want to explore freedom. No one knows the true definition of it. I think freedom is escaping past restriction but no one is truly free because in some way the human experience finds a way to restrict itself again. My work grows from isolation then explores the awareness of people of what isolation means to them. In my most recent work these relations become clearer and more intimate.