Caroline Woolard

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What is my work about?

I create installations, objects, and social spaces for encounters with fantasies of cooperation. Police barricades become beds. Money is erased in public. A clock ticks for ninety-nine years. Public seats attach to stop sign posts. Cafe visitors use local currency. Office ceilings hold covert messages. Ten thousand students attend classes by paying teachers with barter items. Statements about arts graduates are read on museum plaques. My work is research-based and site-specific. I alter objects to call forth new norms, roles, and rules. A street corner, a community space, a museum, an office, or a school become sites for collective reimagining.

Artist Statement

The objects I make cannot be disentangled from their economic and social lives. My Work Dress is available for barter only. My Statements increase in price according to student loan rates. Artists Report Back is made by BFAMFAPhD, a group which you can contribute to. I understand art as mode of inquiry that expands beyond exhibition and toward life cycle; from display to production, consumption, and surplus allocation. I begin each project with an invitation. I facilitate an experience. A group gathers. I share and develop leadership. The project becomes a group effort, and the objects multiply. The objects are known in the group and shown much later.

I create installations and social spaces for encounters with fantasies of cooperation. Police barricades become beds. Money is erased in public. A clock ticks for ninety-nine years. Public seats attach to stop sign posts. Cafe visitors use local currency. Office ceilings hold covert messages. Ten thousand students attend classes by paying teachers with barter items. Statements about arts graduates are read on museum plaques. My work is research-based and site-specific. I alter objects to call forth new norms, roles, and rules. A street corner, a community space, a museum, an office, or a school become sites for collective reimagining.

To make this shift from object to group, I concern myself with endurance and economic aesthetics. When I source materials, invite joint-work, share or deny decision-making power, and shape future markets for each work, a community of practice emerges. Experience becomes a criterion of knowledge. To the conventional labels of Title, Author(s), Materials, Dimensions, Date, and Provenance, I add Duration, forms of Property, Labor, Transactions, Enterprise, and Finance. Objects become materializations of collective debate; entry points for encounters with fantasies of cooperation.

EDUCATION

2006 BFA, Cooper Union, New York, NY

NON-DEGREE

2015 Judson Church, Art and Social Justice Fellow, New York, NY

2013-2015 Queens Museum of Art, Artist in Residence, Flushing, NY

2012-2013 MoMA, Artist in Residence, New York, NY

Eyebeam: Art & Technology Center, Fellow, New York, NY

2009 Watermill Center, Artist in Residence, Watermill, NY

Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Art, Nature, and Dance, Fellow, New York, NY

2008 MacDowell Colony, Artist in Residence, Peterborough, NH

MULTI-YEAR INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AND COLLABORATION

2013-2015
BFAMFAPhD.com is a group of artists, curators, technologists, and designers who are concerned about the impact of rent, debt, and precarity on culture in the 21st century. Founded by Woolard in 2013, this group has received international attention from policymakers, administrators, art critics, and students.
http://bfamfaphd.com

2009-2015
Trade School is a self-organized learning platform that runs on barter. Students pay teachers with barter items rather than money, making space for mutual aid and reciprocal, radical pedagogy. Co-founded by Woolard in New York in 2009, Trade School is now a global network of barter-based schools, with fifty local chapters supporting one another, from Quito to Tokyo. http://tradeschool.coop/story

2008-2015
OurGoods.org is a resource sharing network for cultural producers. Co-founded by Woolard in 2008, OurGoods connects artists, craftspeople, and activists to share skills, spaces, and objects. OurGoods.org organizes and facilitates monthly resource sharing events across cultural sectors. http://ourgoods.org

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
2012
The Economy of We, University of Massachusetts Amherst Union Gallery, Amherst, MA

2011
Dancing in Your Bedroom , Chazan Gallery, Providence, RI

2010
Was that You or the House? , Watermill Center, Watermill, NY

GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2015
A.I.R. , Queens Museum, Queens, Flushing, NY, curated by Larissa Harris.
Anchor , Hunter Harlem Gallery, New York, NY, forthcoming, curated by Arden Sherman.
Discomfort: Furniture, Function and Form in Contemporary Sculpture, Hunterdon Museum, Clinton, NJ, forthcoming, curated by Liz Sheehan.
New York Close Up , Art21, New York, NY, forthcoming, curated by Wes Miller.
BFAMFAPhD, University of Massachusetts Museum, University of Massachusetts Amherst, forthcoming, Amherst, MA

2014
Crossing Brooklyn , The Brooklyn Museum, New York, NY, curated by Eugenie Tsai.
Maker Biennial, The Museum of Art and Design, New York, NY, curated by Jake Yuzna.
Unruly Engagement , Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH, curated by Bruce Checefsky.
Hidden Economies , Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde, Denmark, curated by Brett Bloom.

2013
MoMA Studio: Exchange Cafe , MoMA Education Department, Cullman Research Center, New York, NY
The Feminist Library System , Visible Futures Lab, New York, NY, curated by Leif Mangelsen.
The Very First Year , Eyebeam, New York, NY, curated by Laurel Ptak.
Added Value , The College of New Jersey Art Gallery, Ewing, NJ, curated by Betsy Alwin.
A.I.R. Open Studios , the Queens Museum of Art, Flushing, NY
Arte Util , Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands
Collective Action Archive , Franklin Street Works, Purchase, NY, curated by Gregory Sholette.

2012
Venice Architecture Biennale , US Pavilion, Venice, Italy, curated by the Institute for Urban Design.
How Much Do I Owe? , No Longer Empty, Long Island City, NY, curated by Manon Sloane.
Ruilen , Mediamatic, Amsterdam, Netherlands, curated by Katayoun Arian.
To Have and To Owe , EFA Project Space, New York, NY, curated by Laurel Ptak and Leigh Claire La Berge.
Silent University , Tate Modern, London, UK, curated by Ahmet Ogut.
Art, Action, Environment! , SJDC Gallery, New York, NY, curated by Radhika Subramaniam.
Trade School, the Museum of Art and Design, New York, NY

2011
Living As Form , Creative Time, New York, NY, curated by Nato Thompson.
Trade School , Cuchifritos, New York, NY
Coincidence of Wants , the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

2010
Alternative Histories , Exit Art, New York, NY, curated by Herb Tam.
Materia , Cabinet Magazine, Brooklyn, NY, curated by Suzanne Stroebe.
Table for Two , Milan Furniture Fair, Milan, Italy, curated by Esterni.
Trade School , The Former Catholic School, New York, NY

2009
Trade School , Grand Opening, New York, NY
Work Dress , Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York, NY, curated by Christine Hill.
Swing Bag , Deitch Projects, New York, NY, curated by Stefan Sagmeister.

SELECTED VISITING ARTIST APPOINTMENTS
2015
Malmo Art Academy, Visiting Artist, Malmo, Sweden
University of Wisconsin Madison Art Department, Artist in Residence
University of Illinois at Chicago, Visiting Artist , Chicago, IL
Grand Valley State University, Visiting Artist, Grand Rapids, MI
University of California, Berkeley, Visiting Artist, Berkeley, CA
UW-Madison Art Department, Artist in Residence, Madison, WI

2014
Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts , Visiting Artist,Copenhagen, Denmark
University of Maine, Visiting Artist, Orono, Maine
Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Visiting Artist, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Products of Design, School of Visual Art, New York, NY

AWARDS AND RESIDENCIES
2015
Fullerton Grand Central Art Center, Artist in Residence, Santa Ana, CA
Triangle Arts, Artist in Residence, New York, NY
Queens Museum Studio Program, Artist in Residence, Flushing, NY
Judson Church Arts and Social Justice Fellowship New York, NY

2014
Queens Museum Studio Program, Artist in Residence, Flushing, NY

2013
MoMA, Artist in Residence, New York, NY
Wired Magazine Smart List, New York, NY
National Innovation Summit for Arts and Culture, Fellow, Boulder, CO
Queens Museum Studio Program, Artist in Residence, Flushing, NY
Eyebeam: Art and Technology, Fellow, New York, NY

2012
Rockefeller Cultural Innovation Fund, Grantee, New York, NY
Eyebeam: Art and Technology, Fellow, New York, NY
smART Power, Bronx Museum and U.S. Department of Cultural Affairs, Finalist, New York, NY

2011
National Endowment for the Arts, Grantee
Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Grantee
The Field, ERPA Grantee, New York, NY
Rockefeller Cultural Innovation Fund, Grantee

2010
The Field, ERPA, Grantee, New York, NY
Rockefeller Cultural Innovation Fund, finalist

2009
iLAND Fellow, New York, NY
The Field, ERPA Grantee
Sculpture Center Finalist, New York, NY

2008
Leon Levy Foundation, Fellow, New York, NY

2007
Elliot Lash Award for Excellence in Sculpture, New York, NY

COMMENTARY ON MY WORK IN BOOKS
2014
Shane Aslan-Selzerand and Ted Purves, What We Want is Free , Second Ed. NY: State University of New York Press, 2014.

2011
Shane Aslan-Selzerand and Ted Purves, What We Want is Free , NY: State University of New York Press, 2011.
Pablo Helguera, Education for Socially Engaged Art , NY: Jorge Pinto Books, Inc., 2011.
Amber Hickey (Ed.), A Guidebook of Alternative Nows , NY: The Journal of Aesthetics and Protest, 2011
Herb Tam, Alternative Histories , Cambridge: MIT Press, 2011.

2010
Rachel Botsman, What’s Mine is Yours: The Rise of Collaborative Consumption , NY: Harper Business, 2010.
Temporary Services, Art Work: A National Conversation About Art, Labor, and Economics , Chicago: Half Letter Press, 2010.
Nato Thompson, Contractions of Time: On Social Practice from a Temporal Perspective , NY: e-flux, 2010.

2009
Douglas Rushkoff, Life , Inc. NY: Random House, 2009.

COMMENTARY ON MY WORK IN JOURNALS, MAGAZINES, AND NEWSPAPERS
2015
John Haskell., “Caroline Woolard,” BOMB Magazine, 2015.
Yates McKee, “Art After Occupy,” Waging Non-Violence, 2015.
Leigh Claire LaBerge, “Wages Against Artwork: The Social Practice of Decommodification,” South Atlantic Quarterly , special issue, “Entrepreneurship” eds. Imre Szeman and Dan Harvey, 2015.

2014
Nate Cohan, “Reframing the Debt Debate with BFAMFAPHD,” Art in America, February 12, 2014.
“Artists Report Back: What is a Work of Art in The Age of $120,000 Art Degrees?” Gnome Magazine, October, 2014.
“Artists Report Back,” The Reading List – Bringing it Back Edition: Art Resources Project, October 17, 2014.
“Artists Report Back: What is a Work of Art in The Age of $120,000 Art Degrees?” New York Theater, October 27, 2014.
“Artists Report Back: What is a Work of Art in The Age of $120,000 Art Degrees?” Museum Trends, December 23, 2014.
“Artists Report Back: What is a Work of Art in The Age of $120,000 Art Degrees?” The Hyperarchival
Parallax, November 2, 2014.
Noah Berlatsky, “What Can You Really Do With a Degree in the Arts?” The Atlantic, November 6, 2014.
Katherine Brooks, “Most Artists Who Make A Living From Their Work Are White, Research Says,” The Huffington Post, October 24, 2014.
Ann Brown, “New Study: Most Artists who Earn a Living from Their Craft are White,” Madam Noire, November 10, 2014.
Zak Cheney-Rice, “78% of America’s Professional Artists Have One Striking Thing in Common,”
Identities.MIC, October 27, 2014.
Alexis Clements, “Indicting Higher Education in the Arts and Beyond,” Hyperallergic, October 20, 2014.
Leah Falk, “Caution: Artists At Work,” The Billfold, November 13, 2014.
Roberto A. Ferdman, “If you’re lucky enough to earn a living from your art, you’re probably white,” Washington Post, October 21, 2014
John Guida, “If David Byrne Does Not Care About Contemporary Art, Should We?” New York Times,
October 29, 2014.
Xeni Jardin, “It’s all but impossible to earn a living as a working artist, new report shows,” BoingBoing, October 20, 2014.
Whitney Kimball, “Dueling Reports, Is the Post-Art School Job Crisis Bullshit,” ARTFCITY, October 22, 2014.
Eileen Kinsella, “Study Says Most Artists Who Make A Living Are White,” Artnet News, October 23, 22, 2014.
Sanja Lazic, “ALL WHITE?” Widewalls, October 29, 2014.
“Fare la vita da artista: Una ricerca statunitense racconta quelli che ce la fanno a mantenersi con l’arte,”  LK  Cultura/Linkiesta,  October 23,
Jed Lipinski, “Only 1 in 10 art school grads actually become working artists, report says,” The Times-Picayune, October 20, 2014.
Chris Marblo, “Art school and the (non)working artist,” Times Union, October 30, 2014.
“Indicting Higher Education in the Arts and Beyond,” College Arts Association – CAA News, November 5, 2014.
Matthew Newton, “Art School Blues,” Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) Blog, October 21, 2014.
“Most Artists Who Make A Living From Their Work Are White, Research Says,” Omaha Sun Times: News Feed, October 24, 2014.
Michael Rushton, “What Do College Students Do in the Arts After Graduation?” For What It’s Worth: Artsjournal Blog, October 24, 2014.
Peter Schjeldahl, “Local Heroes: The Brooklyn Museum surveys recent art from the borough,” The New Yorker, October 20, 2014.
Andrew Sullivan, “It’s A Hard Smock Life,” The Dish, October 25, 2014.
Sydney Skybetter, “When Artists Expect to Earn a Living,” Skybetter Business Bureau, December 17, 2014.
Scott Timberg, “How Artists Do (and Don’t) Make a Living,” Culture Crash: Scott Timberg on Creative Destruction, ArtsJournal, October 21, 2014.
“Todo sea por amor al arte. ¿Si estudias arte te vas a morir de hambre? La respuesta NO te va a sorprender,” LifeBoxSet, October 22, 2014.
Anya Ulinich, “Crossing Brooklyn Scratches the Surface of Hyperlocal Potential in Hippest Borough,” Jewish Daily Forward, October 28, 2014.

2013
Craig Redman, “The Wired Smart List 2013,” Wired [UK], December 13, 2013.
Jillian Steinhauer, “Where the Money Is,” Brooklyn Quarterly, November 2013.
Randy Kennedy,”Social Practice Art is Intended to Nurture,” New York Times, May 20, 2013.

2012
Tal Beery, “Barter-Based School Goes Global,” Shareable, May 22, 2012.
Laura Flanders, “An Economy We Want,” The Nation, March 21, 2012.
Ben Valentine, “Alternative Economies: A Conversation with Caroline Woolard,” Hyperallergic, May 4, 2012.

2011
Nana Asfour, “Trade School,” The New Yorker, May 2011.
V. L. Hendrickson, “The Class System is Cashless,” Wall Street Journal, February 5, 2011.
Anya Kamenetz, “The Giving Economy: Caroline Woolard,” Fast Company, February 22, 2011.

2010
Emily Rueb, “A Trade School Where Ideas are Currency,” New York Times, February 23, 2010.
Jenny Jaskey,”Interview with Caroline Woolard of OurGoods,” Rhizome, January 20, 2010.